Sperms can not be stolen, rules judge in paternity case

Sperms can not be stolen, rules judge in paternity case

İZMİR
Sperms can not be stolen, rules judge in paternity case

A Turkish court has dismissed the “stolen sperm” defense of a businessman in an ongoing paternity lawsuit opened by his ex-partner, saying that “sperms can not be considered as moveable property.”

The file, held in the western province of İzmir since 2018, was finalized on Jan. 11.

According to the case, Sevtap Şensarı, 45, and her 61-year-old partner, only identified with the initials H.S.T., were living together since 2000.

Due to T.’s wish to have a baby boy, Şensarı went to a clinic in North Cyprus with her partner’s sperms to have a baby in vitro fertilization in 2015. She gave birth to twin boys the next year.

Things turned ugly when T. denied they were his children and started domestic violence.

In 2018, Şensarı went to court in which she proved with a DNA test that T. was the father of the boys and gained alimony for the children.

Last November, T. made his latest move in court, indicating that Şensarı “stole his sperms.”

T.’s allegation was exactly similar to the German tennis giant Boris Becker’s defense in a paternity case opened by Russian model Angela Ermakowa in 2001.

On Jan. 11, the judge denied T.’s defense and decreed that “sperms can not be considered as moveable property.”

“Theft of sperms is out of the question,” the judge added.

Turkey, paternity test,