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POLITICS > Turkish FM calls for ‘big’ Syria effort but West unsure

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Turkish Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoglu listens during a TV debate on Syria at the 43rd Annual Meeting of the World Economic Forum, WEF, in Davos, Switzerland, Friday, Jan. 25, 2013. AP Photo/Michel Euler

Turkish Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoglu listens during a TV debate on Syria at the 43rd Annual Meeting of the World Economic Forum, WEF, in Davos, Switzerland, Friday, Jan. 25, 2013. AP Photo/Michel Euler

Turkish Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoğlu criticized the international solution process in Syria in a recent televised interview, calling on prominent actors to intensify efforts.

“I understand the lack of decision making in political matters, but what about humanitarian problems?” Davutoğlu asked, mentioning a previous attempt that had been “turned down at the 21st checkpoint stop.”

“Can’t there be unity in offering help and humanitarian aid?” Davutoğlu asked.

When asked about Russian involvement in the peace process, Davutoğlu repeated the need to leave Syrian President Bashar al-Assad out of the transition process, despite Russian dissent on the matter.
“The Syrian opposition, the neighboring countries and 175 members of the United Nations have agreed to a transition process without al-Assad,” Davutoğlu said. “But what really matters is not what one or five actors agree on, but what the Syrian people really want for themselves.”

Russia wishes to keep al-Assad in power during the transition, but that would cause serious tension, and would jeopardize the security of the other ministers, according to Davutoğlu.

“Can there be a healthy transition process with al-Assad and his system of security still intact?” Davutoğlu asked.

“The world no longer trusts al-Assad. As I’ve said before, the U.N. secretary-general will be apologizing to the people in Aleppo in 10 years, the way Ban Ki-moon apologized for Srebrenica.”

Davutoğlu also said he was concerned about the involvement of the Democratic Union Party (PYD) in the Syrian conflict due their reported links to the outlawed Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK).

Two points of concern are evident for Turkey: the PYD’s support for the Syrian president and possible PYD support of the PKK, Davutoğlu said.

“These issues hamper the legitimacy of the PYD in the Syrian conflict,” Davutoğlu said.

Arbil support against terror

Davutoğlu also spoke about regional dynamics, saying Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG) leader Masoud Barzani supported Turkey in its fight against the PKK.

“The problem has multiple dimensions, one of which is neighboring countries, especially northern Iraq,” Davutoğlu said. “Barzani has already voiced support for Turkey.”

Terrorism in Turkey is now being tackled by a “strong political will,” with all political parties owning up to the issue in unity, the minister said.

“Turkey is now a giant on the rise,” Davutoğlu said. “There will be those who wish to put shackles around the giant’s feet.”

‘The West solution has not happened’

Russia wishes to keep al-Assad in power during the transition, but that would cause serious tension and would jeopardize the security of the other ministers, according to Davutoğlu.

“The world no longer trusts al-Assad. As I’ve said before, the U.N. secretary-general will be apologizing to the people in Aleppo in 10 years, the way Ban Ki-moon apologized for Srebrenica.”

There was no sign the Syrian crisis was going to be resolved anytime soon, the French foreign minister said Jan. 24, in contrast to his prediction last month that the end was near for President al-Assad.

“Things are not moving. The solution that we had hoped for, and by that I mean the fall of Bashar [al-Assad] and the arrival of the coalition to power, has not happened,” Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius said in his annual New Year’s address to the press, Reuters reported.

Fabius said in December that “the end is nearing” for al-Assad.Commenting on the crisis, U.S. President Barack Obama’s nominee for secretary of state, John Kerry, said he was not optimistic on reaching a compromise with Russia over the Syrian crisis when he addressed the Senate Foreign Relations Committee on Jan. 24.

Kerry said there was a moment when Syria reached out to the West but that the moment had long passed. “History caught up to us. That never happened. And it’s now moot, because [Syrian President Bashar al-Assad] has made a set of judgments that are inexcusable, that are reprehensible, and I think [he] is not long for remaining as the head of state in Syria,” the senator said. “I think the time is ticking.”

Senator John McCain, a leading Republican and a fierce critic of Obama’s policy on Syria, said the status quo is unacceptable. “We can do a lot more without putting American boots on the ground,” McCain said. “Otherwise, we will be judged harshly by history.”

Kerry said the United States must find a way to work with Russia but he is not optimistic about the U.S.-Russian relationship. “I don’t want inquisitiveness or curiosity about what possibilities might exist with the Russians to be translated into optimism. I don’t have optimism. I have hope.”

January/25/2013

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A.MENAF GÜLBAY

1/26/2013 10:32:11 AM

what a pity for some commend. becouse of no body know what happend in syrya especıally syriyan people. The world hane no humanright. Mr. Davutoğlu have a lot of effort but nobody hear him. ı wish soon as soon possible who are respondible about this ıssu all of them "JUDGED HYRSLY BY HİSTORY" ALSO THEY WİLL BE HANGİNG İN GALLOWS/TREE so ı hopefull Davutoğlu will be finish this ıssue... will rescue those have a suffer people please be quick

ilker avni

1/25/2013 8:26:16 PM

Turkey should have invaded Syria when Assad shot down the Turkish f4 fighter jet,it would have all been over by now.Assad will face the ICC and he knows it,like a ganster hold up with cops all around Assad is fighting for his life to the end.

joe Maddin

1/25/2013 8:20:34 PM

Davutoglu: “The world no longer trusts al-Assad" Maybe, but the Syrians do. The proof is that he is still here, strong with a united army and united loyalists

KıbrıslıTürk

1/25/2013 8:06:21 PM

Old fashion dictatorship in ME is not acceptable anymore, simple is that.

mara mcglothin

1/25/2013 6:58:28 PM

VARGEN VARGEN You obviously have "evil war mongering imperialism" confused with "humanitarian aid". No good deed goes unpunished to be sure.

mesude salihli

1/25/2013 6:17:53 PM

I think he is expecting to be the governor of Syria afterward.

Blue Dotterel

1/25/2013 4:44:58 PM

The world needs to act against these war criminals and abusers of human rights in Syria: Ahmet Davutoglu, Recep Tayyip Erdogan and the rest of the AKP sectarian gang.

joe Maddin

1/25/2013 4:44:23 PM

"The Syrian opposition, the neighboring countries and 175 members of the United Nations have agreed to a transition process without al-Assad,” Where did he get that ?

mara mcglothin

1/25/2013 3:52:04 PM

This man should have been a stand up comedian! Everyone needs to stay out of this and let Syria handle their own business.

Vargen Vargen

1/25/2013 3:48:13 PM

"but what about humanitarian problems?” Davutoğlu asked regarding Syria. But what was the reaction when Sadam Hussein killed 300 000 people and US stepped in and put an end to it? How much did Turkey then support the enormous sufferings of the Iraqees?
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