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Obedient Wives Club sparks debate in Malaysia

ISTANBUL - Daily News with wires | 6/13/2011 12:00:00 AM |

Social ills such as prostitution, domestic violence and divorce can be cured by urging women to be submissive and keep their men happy in the bedroom, according to the Obedient Wives Club of Malaysia.

Social ills such as prostitution, domestic violence and divorce can be cured by urging women to be submissive and keep their men happy in the bedroom, according to the Obedient Wives Club of Malaysia.

The club aims to educate wives on how to keep their husbands sexually satisfied in order to avoid infidelity. 

The club’s vice president, Rohayah Mohamad, said wives must go beyond traditional roles as good cooks or good mothers and learn to “obey, serve and entertain” their husbands to prevent them from straying or misbehaving.

“This way, the family institution is protected and we can curb social ills,” said Rohayah, who is also one of the club’s founders. She claims that “disobedient wives are the cause for upheaval in this world” because men are not happy at home and their minds and souls are disturbed.

Launched on June 4, the Obedient Wives Club currently boasts some 800 members in Malaysia and is looking to expand to Singapore. Though the club was founded by a fringe Islamic group known as Global Ikhwan, it is open to wives of all races and religion.

Global Ikhwan spokesperson Siti Maznah Mohd Taufik also said domestic abuse happens when wives do not obey their husband’s orders. When asked if a wife should shoulder the blame when abused, she said: “Yes, most probably because she didn't listen to her husband.”

Siti Maznah believes that women have the duty of staying attractive and providing their husbands with a satisfying sex life so that they will not stray or turn to prostitutes. She herself is a second wife and a mother of five, with a total of 16 children in her household.

“Wives should welcome them with sexy clothes and alluring smiles when in the privacy of their homes,” Siti Maznah said, adding that she and everyone in the club practiced what they preached. “My husband is a happy man, you can see it from his actions,” she said.

The launch of this club has generated angry responses from politicians and women’s rights groups in Malaysia, a Muslim majority country where women are still victims of gender bias despite holding high posts in the government and corporate world and outnumbering their male counterparts at higher level institutions.

“Unfortunately even today, there are still many Muslim women who are ignorant of their rights or culturally inhibited to exercise their rights in full,” said Shahrizat Abdul Jalil, the minister of Women, Family and Community Development.

“To hinge fidelity, domestic violence and the fulfillment of a husband's responsibilities purely on a wife's capacity to be obedient and to stimulate sexual arousal is not only demeaning to wives, but to husbands as well.”

The Malaysian women’s group Sisters in Islam said Islam advocates marriages based on mutual cooperation and respect. “Domestic violence happens regardless of women’s behavior,” it said. “Communication, not submission, is vital to sustain any healthy relationship.”

[HH] This story was compiled from the Washington Post and the Malaysian Insider stories by the HDN staff.

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